Let George Do It!

by Hedda Hopper
The Chicago Tribune
April 2, 1950

George Murphy not only believes something in Hollywood. He does something about it.

Few men in motion pictures have done more for the industry than George. And his job is just beginning.

“I’d like to make a movie pretty soon, so I could get a rest,” he says. Asked whether he still practices his dancing, George replies, “How can you practice dancing in an airplane? There’s a law against it.”

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Eleanor Powell

screenepowell

Screen Album
Spring 1937

ELEANOR POWELL has a way of winning every tap dancing contest she puts her toe into. In fact, she’s been female champ for four years now. And it is surely an honest-to-goodness fair contest, for the judges sit under the stage and listen to the tap routines. In this way, beauty, personality or both don’t count—just fine and accurate stepping.

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If You Were Bob Hope’s House Guest

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by Dorothy Deere
Photoplay
June 1947

There’ll be Hope—and the four Hopefuls—and life—warmth—and laughter.

SO YOU think your weekend with the Hopes is going to be a howling affair with your comic host springing trap doors and slipping rubber olives into the Martinis? Then you have a surprise in store. For the howls will be tempered to smiles in this home run on graciousness, even though it was built on gags.

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Bob Hope

Screen Album
Fall 1943

I USED to wonder,” cracks Crosby, “whether Hope was born or his mother knitted him.” Statistics prove he was born. Happened in England in 1904, but a Cleveland, O., up-bringing is responsible for that remunerative sense of humor. It earns him about $400,000 annually—about $150,000 from radio, the rest from Paramount, where he makes all those “Road” movies. (more…)

Portrait of the Man with the Chin

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by Joseph Henry Steele
Photoplay
April 1940

A black and white of Bob Hope—a comedian on whom Fate cast a benign eye when a hunch played him false

HIS favorite Scotch joke is the one about, the Scotchman who sat up all night and watched his wife’s vanishing cream.

He considers the most foolish act of his life the time he rejected his first radio offer because “radio would never amount to anything.” He recalls, wistfully, that he lost five years before he began to get his share of the ether bonanza.

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